While a carbohydrate-restricted nutritional approach is not the “standard” way of eating for the majority of people trying to lead a healthy lifestyle, we do hear about low carbohydrate “diets” all the time.

Unfortunately, I’ve seen again and again how people associate this way of eating with eggs and bacon, 16-oz steaks, and bags of pork rinds, all topped with dollops of mayo… and a cup of heavy cream for dessert. Fat (mostly) and protein scare away people. So do misconceptions about the lack of vegetables, and the idea that “low carb” implies gorging on high fat foods.

A low carbohydrate nutritional approach can’t be healthy, right?

I will sort here through some of the research on low carbohydrate nutrition, eating habits and exercise. I will also write my musings on different nutrition-related topics, and show that low carbohydrate does not mean a diet of steaks and egg salads.

Before anything, I should probably reveal my bias. I am what many other low carbers call a “purist”, meaning that I focus on whole foods, foods from natural sources, and I do not recommend all sort of processed products. It’s an approach to which I slowly arrived based on my own experience, and based on what I’ve seen to work (or, more often, not work) for others.

While a carbohydrate-restricted nutritional approach is not the “standard” way of eating for the majority of people trying to lead a healthy lifestyle, we do hear about low carbohydrate “diets” all the time. Unfortunately, I’ve seen again and again people associating this way of eating with eggs and bacon, 16-oz steaks, and bags of pork rinds, all topped with dollops of mayo… and a cup of heavy cream for dessert. Fat (mostly) and protein scare away people. So do misconceptions about the lack of vegetables, and the idea that “low carb” implies gorging on high fat foods. A low carbohydrate nutritional approach can’t be healthy, right?

I will sort here through some of the research on low carbohydrate nutrition, eating habits and exercise. I will also write my musings on different nutrition-related topics, and show that low carbohydrate does not mean a diet of steaks and egg salads.

Before anything, I should probably reveal my bias. I am what many other low carbers call a “purist”, meaning that I focus on whole foods, foods from natural sources, and I do not recommend all sort of processed products. It’s an approach to which I slowly arrived based on my own experience, and on what I’ve seen to work (or, more often, not work) for others.

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